a.d. jenkins, ed.d.

Orlando Jones - Bucket Challenge

(Source: youtube.com)

(Source: baelor, via lifeandfilm-allin-one)

psychogemini:

deathtasteslikechicken:

abs-gabs:

SOMEONE FINALLY SAID IT

So if a teenager is at school for roughly 8 hours, and they are doing homework for 6+ hours, and they need AT LEAST 9 HOURS OF SLEEP FOR THEIR DEVELOPING BRAINS, then they may have 0-1 hours for other activities like eating, bathing, exercise, socializing (which is actually incredibly important for emotional, mental, and physical health, as well as the development of skills vital to their future career and having healthy romantic relationships among other things), religious activities, hobbies, extra curriculars, medical care of any kind, chores (also a skill/habit development thing and required by many parents), relaxation, and family time?  Not to mention that your parents may or may not pressure you to get a job, or you might need to get one for economic reasons.

I will never not reblog this

(via kyssthis16)

Junot Diaz: This is How You Lose Her

(Source: youtube.com)

Why You Should Thank Black People Every Summer | The More You Know (Abou…

(Source: youtube.com)

my-tardis-sense-is-tingling:

These tweets (and one retweet) are from my friend Ryan, a journalist who has been on the ground in Ferguson for the past few days. (His Twitter account is here, and it’s a great source of updates on the situation there   [x]).

I just wanted to remind everybody that while spreading word about Michael Brown’s unjust murder and the horrifying events of the night of August 14, 2014, please do not oversimplify or ignore the complexities of the situation.

Some journalists in the town have been doing what journalists do: focusing on all the negative aspects about the community to try and make it look like a hell-hole in order to sell their own pictures and stories, and basically all many of them want to do is further their own careers. But focusing on all that negativity only paints the picture of one side of the story, ignoring a lot of other important things going on there.

Please do not fall prey to the media’s game. Anger at the actions of the police in Ferguson is totally justified, but in the midst of that we cannot allow the people who are living with the situation every day to be dehumanized. Despite all this tragedy and chaos going on around them, they’re still a community and in many ways they’re pulling through all of it together. They want peace. Anyone looting or burning things down is a very small portion of the community. The whole story is so much bigger.

A story doesn’t need tear gas to be interesting. We need to hear every side of this story, not just the horrific parts.

TL:DR: please don’t fall prey to media attempts to dehumanize and oversimplify the situation in ferguson!!

(via kyssthis16)

Happy Friday

What do you do when you’re left to your own devices, because your help took better jobs, and everyone else doesn’t know what’s going on? Pick up the pieces and do the work yourself, cause you’re in charge

Say it loud : I”M IN CHARGE!

Professor Says He Has Solved a Mystery Over a Slave'€™s Novel

copperbadge:

Hannah Bond, a slave on a North Carolina plantation owned by John Hill Wheeler, is the actual writer of “The Bondwoman’s Narrative,” the book signed by Hannah Crafts.

Enslaved on a plantation in Murfreesboro, N.C., Bond is believed to have been a self-educated woman who worked as a maid to the mistress of the house, Ellen Wheeler, assisting her with errands and personal duties, like styling her hair. But around 1857, Bond disguised herself as a boy and escaped, fleeing first to upstate New York and then to New Jersey, where she eventually married and found work as a schoolteacher.

I cannot fucking believe I’ve never heard of this book. BRB going to library.

I have this book on my self. Henry Louis Gates found it somewhere and I think he did some of the editing.

(via kyssthis16)

youngblackandvegan:

caramelblackness:

humansofnewyork:

“It’s been tough in law school. Cause you know, I grew up around here, and I’ve still got some of that ghettoness in me. I talk a little different. I came up with this sort of nonchalant attitude, and now I’m competing with a bunch of private school kids that are ruthless. I’m supposed to read sixty pages a night, and I’m realizing that I don’t read as well as I thought I did. I realized that public school kids are just behind. I did horrible the first year. I almost folded. But I pulled it back together. I took a tough internship that summer and came back strong. Cause it’s destined to happen.”

"I almost folded. But I pulled it back together."
Real shit!!

this one hit real close to home. this life as a 1L, being where i am, knowing where i’ve been
bruh, i feel you in so many ways, i can’t even explain it

youngblackandvegan:

caramelblackness:

humansofnewyork:

“It’s been tough in law school. Cause you know, I grew up around here, and I’ve still got some of that ghettoness in me. I talk a little different. I came up with this sort of nonchalant attitude, and now I’m competing with a bunch of private school kids that are ruthless. I’m supposed to read sixty pages a night, and I’m realizing that I don’t read as well as I thought I did. I realized that public school kids are just behind. I did horrible the first year. I almost folded. But I pulled it back together. I took a tough internship that summer and came back strong. Cause it’s destined to happen.”

"I almost folded. But I pulled it back together."

Real shit!!

this one hit real close to home. this life as a 1L, being where i am, knowing where i’ve been

bruh, i feel you in so many ways, i can’t even explain it

(via kyssthis16)

jeffreyscales:

A Young Child Named Maya Rudolph
In 1975 I had just come off a brief tour I was on with a band that was opening for Joe Walsh, when Irving Azoff’s company, Frontline Management, which managed Walsh suggested I’d be a good fit to tour with Minnie Riperton.
They were right; when I met Minnie I felt I’d met a long lost older sibling, and would continue working for her after she left Azoff’s management, and throughout the remaining years of her career.
Besides a voice seemingly from heaven, she had the most delightful family as well. Her two children Marc, and Maya were a joy, and her husband, Richard Rudolph, who still to this day, is one of nicest people you could ever meet.
I was just in my early 20’s, toting around a Hasselblad camera wherever I went. When I was working as Minnie’s tour manager, I rarely had the time, or situation to formally photograph her. Although I always had my camera, I was still a very young photographer, and had not yet developed the skills to capture what it was I saw in her, so my collection of photographs of her is limited.
However, during our off time off from touring, I was often at their home around her family and photographed Maya frequently. Most children get very antsy in front of a camera, but she seemed to be fascinated with the photographic process. She held a firm gaze and always seemed to be studying this photographic process very closely, so I’m not at all surprised that she’s become one the finest comedic actors working in front of a camera today.
I’m also not surprised that Maya found her way into comedy. What few people may know about her mother is that Minnie was one of the most hilarious women you’d ever meet. She had a wry, even ribald wit that would totally disarm the coolest of characters, the biggest record producers, and the most pompous industry executives of the day.
Maya was five or six years old in this photograph. It was taken at their home in Westwood, CA near the UCLA campus. Maya in her swim suit, sitting in front of the TV with a vintage cable TV box, near a baseball bat & glove, while Minnie in one of her flowing dresses steps out of frame right, and “Sparkle” their devoted Standard Poodle slips by behind her. 
This photograph captures so much of the special warmth, and familial connection I experienced at their home during those days. They were a very special family, whom I will always appreciate how generously they brought me into their lives. 
 

jeffreyscales:

A Young Child Named Maya Rudolph

In 1975 I had just come off a brief tour I was on with a band that was opening for Joe Walsh, when Irving Azoff’s company, Frontline Management, which managed Walsh suggested I’d be a good fit to tour with Minnie Riperton.

They were right; when I met Minnie I felt I’d met a long lost older sibling, and would continue working for her after she left Azoff’s management, and throughout the remaining years of her career.

Besides a voice seemingly from heaven, she had the most delightful family as well. Her two children Marc, and Maya were a joy, and her husband, Richard Rudolph, who still to this day, is one of nicest people you could ever meet.

I was just in my early 20’s, toting around a Hasselblad camera wherever I went. When I was working as Minnie’s tour manager, I rarely had the time, or situation to formally photograph her. Although I always had my camera, I was still a very young photographer, and had not yet developed the skills to capture what it was I saw in her, so my collection of photographs of her is limited.

However, during our off time off from touring, I was often at their home around her family and photographed Maya frequently. Most children get very antsy in front of a camera, but she seemed to be fascinated with the photographic process. She held a firm gaze and always seemed to be studying this photographic process very closely, so I’m not at all surprised that she’s become one the finest comedic actors working in front of a camera today.

I’m also not surprised that Maya found her way into comedy. What few people may know about her mother is that Minnie was one of the most hilarious women you’d ever meet. She had a wry, even ribald wit that would totally disarm the coolest of characters, the biggest record producers, and the most pompous industry executives of the day.

Maya was five or six years old in this photograph. It was taken at their home in Westwood, CA near the UCLA campus. Maya in her swim suit, sitting in front of the TV with a vintage cable TV box, near a baseball bat & glove, while Minnie in one of her flowing dresses steps out of frame right, and “Sparkle” their devoted Standard Poodle slips by behind her.

This photograph captures so much of the special warmth, and familial connection I experienced at their home during those days. They were a very special family, whom I will always appreciate how generously they brought me into their lives.

 

(via soulbrotherv2)